Ape Wind

The Columbus Music Scene and Beyond

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Mar 6, 2013 – I was feeling a little frisky on a Wednesday night, so I packed up my camera and got a friend to go out to the bar with me. We decided to head out to Kobo as it is close by. It’s a wonderful local bar to hit on any night of the week. I personally suggest this bar for live music and good service. Jacob Wooten, the owner, can be found behind the bar or just hanging around most nights. He is always bringing in good regional talent that you wont find anywhere else in Columbus, and mixes it up well with good local bands. We paid our eight-dollar cover, steep for a Wednesday night, and got a few drinks at the bar. It seems we were supporting a band from out of town on the bill. This made me feel a lot better about the high cost of entry. The band of the evening to be reviewed was William Reach, a local group. We had arrived a little late and were catching them as the fourth band of the night out of five.

William Reach at Kobo

William Reach at Kobo

William Reach consists of Christopher Heidel, Casey Costello, Nikolas Heidel, and Thomas Kurth. There was a fifth extra man at the show on stage with them for half the show, but I was not able to get their name. Looking at their stage setup I was prepared for an interesting show. On the stage sat a full drum kit, a random floor tom with padded mallets sitting on it, a red Nord keyboard, a standard four-string bass, a stomp peddle connected to a tambourine, and acoustic guitar. The members took the stage and as they sound checked the bass player promptly belched into the microphone. My female friends assure me this is not a way to impress them while up on stage. If you’re not going to sing or engage the audience in some interesting way, and belching is hardly interesting, then back off the microphone and save our ears. This is not Revenge of the Nerds and you are not Booger.

William Reach at Kobo

William Reach at Kobo

They started their set with a song centered on the lead vocalist and his acoustic guitar. The vocals were thin and reedy, very reminiscent of Marcus Mumford (Mumford & Sons), but still had his own style and twist on the feel. At first I was a little hesitant towards the vocals, but found myself very appreciative of them by the end of the night. They were strangely soothing. The random floor tom that sat on the stage got a lot of use in this first song. I initially thought it was very gimmicky to have a random floor tom for use, but it really just fit. No other way to put it.

A few more non-descript songs passed by. I wasn’t terribly interested in them, they seemed to all fit a pattern of starting soft with guitar and vocals then, after a certain point would break out into full band playing quickly and loudly. Would have been nice if this was only one or two of the eight songs of the set, but turned out to be six of them. The sixth song of the set really got me going though. The drums had a nice march feel to them, and it was really easy to get lost in the vocals, which seemed to fit this song. I would like to tell you the name of the song, but when I tried to communicate with the band they were all too drunk to have any sort of decent conversation with.

William Reach taking shots at Kobo

William Reach taking shots at Kobo

The show itself was so-so. I really liked the instrumentation and the songs themselves seemed well thought out and put together. I could tell that these were very talented musicians and they really could pull off a good show, but they seemed to be having an off night. That or the alcohol was getting to them a bit too much. I would suggest seeing them if you have a chance, earlier in the night and perhaps they will have a stronger performance. Being a musician myself I know one can’t always play the perfect show.

 

William Reach can be found on bandcamp at: http://williamreach.bandcamp.com/

 -V-

Feb 23, 2013 – Well I was in the King Avenue Five in Grandview Heights on a Saturday night at the local Pet Promise fundraiser show. There we five bands performing that night and I decided to review the one smack dab in the middle. They had the best spot of the evening with the crowd plump and fueled by the fresh intake of alcohol and festivities, which any bar rat worth his salt knows only takes a few hours to dwindle and become a sloppier merriment due to the same intake of alcohol.

The Jeffrey Truck Band at King Avenue Five

The Jeffrey Truck Band at King Avenue Five

After the initial set up of the band and a much needed bathroom break for myself. “Why in Gods name are the bathrooms located upstairs all alone in this bar?” My aging bladder kept asking. Oh well, I needed the workout, I suppose. The six-piece band known simply as The Jeffrey Truck Band took the stage. Nothing against the two acts before them, one being a South American blend of salsa and jazzy rock, the other being a somewhat silly two piece throwing out INXS and Kiesha acoustic covers, but the Jeffrey Truck Band kicked their asses and initially blew my mind, with their amazing Satana like style and awesome guitar licks.

The Jeffrey Truck Band at King Avenue Five

The Jeffrey Truck Band at King Avenue Five

I really wish I could tell you their names along with their instrumentation but their facebook page has yet to accept me as a friend as of the writing of this article, so my information on them is minimal. It doesn’t look like they play out all that often or have been together very long either, but they do have their poop together as a band. That first song of theirs titled “Sometimes I Drink,” knocked the rough and ready crowd on their asses and the piano player and lead guitarists were the main attraction for me.

The lead singer guy who had his head shaved bald wasn’t bad either, not remarkable vocals but he fit the tunes in a gravely and soulful sort of way. The people were up and dancing almost from the get go and it really didn’t stop.

The Jeffrey Truck Band at King Avenue Five

The Jeffrey Truck Band at King Avenue Five

I was definitely more of a fan of their originals, which I am very glad they had the intelligence to call out the names of before each one. Like  “Silence Grows,” and “Face the Crowd.” They executed the covers well enough but it seemed they brought the place down, a little in tempo. No biggie, just my preference was lying with the upbeat originals on this particular night. Maybe I was getting a little sloshy myself and just needed a pick me up.

Each musician played their parts well in the band and they were the highlight of the night for me. Their style didn’t stray much from the Neuvo Santana sound, but hey, why fix what isn’t broken. I do have to note that the extra acoustic guitarist that was playing off to the side didn’t seem to add much. He kind of seemed a trifle unnecessary, nothing against the guy, but maybe he could add in on a few vocals or step out of the way so they can feature the bass player a bit more, I dunno. But all in all my experience of The Jeffrey Truck Band was a plus… Now if I could just figure out which one was Jeffrey? Over and out.

The Jeffrey Truck Band can be found on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheJeffreyTruckBand

-Oddfellow

Feb 22, 2013 – Getting back out there is always fun after quite a long hiatus. It feels right to be back out and writing regularly. Apewind has been a long running dream of mine and I’m glad to get the chance to get it back up and running.

Intervene playing Circus

Intervene playing Circus

Let me start off by saying Circus is not normally the venue one wants to be “heard” in. The sound is usually mixed overpoweringly awkward and recently the vocals in many mixes have been nearly nonexistent. That being said, if one can sound good here, they would pretty much be set anywhere. Generally speaking the sound here is reminiscent of Bernie’s on a good night.

Our band tonight is Intervene, opening the show for Crème de la Femme, a rock and roll, burlesque, and comedy showcase. This show is something worth watching at some point in your life. The band consists of D Johnson on bass, Dan Calvin on drums, and Zel Marquis filling out the guitar and vocals. Johnson from the band described themselves as, “the slacker generation rip offs.”

D Johnson and Dan Calvin of Intervene

D Johnson and Dan Calvin of Intervene

Looking at the guys on stage I wasn’t sure what to expect. Johnson was adorned in a Soundgarden T, and testing his amp with some distorted bass effects, always a pleasant sound to my ears. Then the first song, “Scarlet” kicked off. It started with a very tinny sounding guitar riff that was quickly met with simplistic, yet effective drums. Then filled in nicely with bass. I was blown away at the fullness of their sound. It wasn’t too overbearing. The sound guy got just the right amount of everything in the mix.  Marquis began mumbling some non-descript lyrics; I couldn’t make out a single word of them. Wasn’t sure if it was poor judgment on the sound guys part or intended. These quickly gave way to screamed vocals, which I was not particular on. The entirety of the song seemed to consist of just three chords. These guys were nailing the simple yet effective musical style of the 90s.

Zel Marquis of Intervene playing Circus

Zel Marquis of Intervene playing Circus

The next song felt very much like the first, almost wouldn’t have noticed it was different save for a bass solo in the middle and it was well played. The screaming vocals continued, and I still wasn’t really into them. The next song was a bit of a gem. I was not enjoying the screaming so much and I was very surprised when Marquis began actual singing. I hate to say it, but wow, he should stick to the screaming.

The next few songs went by and I found myself losing interest. Well I was until “Whirlpool” started. This song was their strongest of the whole set. Marquis redeemed his singing, perhaps in the earlier attempt he was just not warmed up enough. The bass was rocking a great distorted tone. The drummer was filling everything else in, and surprisingly with a rather broken down four piece set with only two cymbals. In true 90s grunge rock style the song ended with a total cluster of falling apart sound. I was very pleased with this.

To end the night they finished with cover of Nirvana’s “Aneurysm.” Simply put, it’s not hard to cover Nirvana, but it is hard to cover Nirvana and sound really good. They pulled this off very well. It was very cool to hear this. Overall I’d say they are a worthwhile band to check out when you get a chance. The energy they put forth on stage could be easily felt, and their sound was very full for a three piece.

You can find Intervene on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/midwestgrunge

-V-